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William Stewart Haviland

William Stewart Haviland

William Stewart Haviland

WILLIAM STEWART HAVILAND, son of Robert Sheffield (615) and Mary C. (Stewart) Haviland, b. Harrison Co., Ky., Mch. 22, 1823; m., first, near Claysville, Ky., Dec. 30, 1845, Mary Elizabeth Whitehead, b. Mch. 20, 1825; d. at Havilandsville, Ky., Apr. 13, 1849; he m., second, at Cynthiana, Ky., on June 13, 1854, Mary Ellen Jones, b. Oct. 3, 1831, daughter of Robert and Amelia (Smith) Jones. He claims to have learned to write and make figures in a cotton and woolen factory, looking at his father marking bales of heavy white cotton and woolen goods for the Southern market. Through all his voluminous correspondence with both Frederick and Frank Haviland he is more than anxious for a Haviland book. From a biographical sketch the following is quoted: “Mr. Haviland has always taken a very active part in the development of Harrison County, Ky., of which he is a native, and has assisted largely in those enterprises which mark the progress of civilization. His early life was spent in assisting his father to conduct a large mercantile and manufacturing business in Havilandsville, at which place he at the age of twenty-one embarked in the manufacture and sale of cabinet-ware on his own account. He continued this business until 1850, when he engaged in establishing the legality and collecting claims in the United States and foreign countries. He is owner of one of the finest houses in the county, located two miles north of Cynthiana on the Cynthiana and Falmouth Turnpike. His farm consists of 200 acres of choice land and the brick house erected by his design is spoken of as the finest farm residence in the county. On Jan. 13, 1900, he sent the late Frederick Haviland pictures of ‘two of my most trusted slaves made free by the operations of the War of the Rebellion. On the 20th day of December when the picture was taken Nelson weighed 131 pounds and Betsy 181. I paid, in 1855, seven hundred dollars for Nelson and on Dec. 25, 1856, at his request, I purchased his wife Betsy and boy baby, for one thousand dollars, as a Christmas gift for him. He took her and her child home that day and they have always been industrious, tidy, proud, and in every way trustworthy, and during the War I took a very active part in the defence of the Union and when rebels or gorillas came about we gave our gold watches and money and silver to Nelson for safe keeping. They are as honest now as then. They live alone and happily in their own comfortable cottage in the city and enjoy the esteem and confidence of all citizens. The day the picture was taken they walked about one-half mile and upstairs to have it taken and as it is the only time they have ever had a picture of themselves they are very proud of it and when the Haviland book comes out I want that picture in it, next to my picture and family. He was b. Dec. 29, 1803, and she in 1820.'”


History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed.
by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin & Co., Chicago, 1882. p. 658.
[Harrison County] [Cynthiana City and Precinct]

W. S. HAVILAND, farmer, P. O. Cynthiana. There are but few families of the Northern belt of the Blue Grass region who are able to trace the genealogy of their ancestry back to the seventeenth century; and of these few the name of William S. Haviland is worthy of more than passing mention in this history. His great grandfather, James Haviland, was born
in New York, May 25, 1740, and died Nov. 25, 1786. He was a farmer, and married Miss Ann Hanniwell; seven children were the issue of their union, of whom was Israel Haviland, born March 12, 1765, in Harrison Purchase, Weschester County, N. Y. He was married to Miss Jane Anderson, Oct. 12, 1788, and died Oct. 23, 1819, in New York City, where for many years he had resided, engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes. There were born to them fourteen children, of whom Robert S., father of our subject, was the second son; he was born Nov. 11, 1796, and emigrated to Kentucky in 1818. April 6, 1820, he married Miss Mary C. Stewart; his death occurred Aug. 8, 1858, at Havilandsville, Harrison County, Ky. He was educated for a sea captain, but spend most of his life in Kentucky. Of the nine children born to them, William S. our subject was the second son.

He was born March 22, 1823 in Harrison County, and Dec. 30, 1845, he married Mary E. Whitehead, whose death occurred April 13, 1849. He was married a second time on June 13, 1854, to Miss Mary Ellen Jones. His children are by his first wife, Mary F., born Jan. 17, 1847; Bettie, born April 11, 1849, and by his second wife, Charles B., born April 19, 1855, Robert S., born Dec. 23, 1857; Carrie, born June 30, 1863. Mr. Haviland is one among the best known and prominent citizens of Harrison County, a
native of the county by birth; he has always taken a very active part in her development, and has assisted largely in those enterprises which mark the progress of civilization. His early life was spent in assisting his father to conduct a large mercantile and manufacturing business in Havilandsville, at which place he at the age of twenty-one years embarked in the manufacture and sale of cabinet-ware on his own account. He continued this business until 1850, when he engaged in establishing the legality and collecting claims in the United States and foreign countries. He is the owner of one of the finest houses in Harrison County, located two miles north of Cynthiana on the Cynthiana and Falmouth Pike. His farm consists of 200 acres of choice land, and the brick residence erected by his design, is spoken of as the finest farm residence in Harrison County. He has always been an energetic and enterprising citizen, and bears a name and reputation of which his children may well be proud. Now, in the latter years of his life he is surrounded with those comforts and enjoying those pleasures that are ever the result of honesty, industry and economy.

W. S. Haviland has a Telephone Installed

1896 June 10
“Telephone put in by John McDonnell. It belongs to the combine, Bishop, Collier, Evans, and McDonnell but to remain in 3 years and they keep it in working order. (But it did not work) Telephone commences working about 3 1/2 oclock P.M., June 11th, 1896.”

Source: “Journal S, William S. Haviland”, page 153.

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Swine Cholera in Cynthiana in 1856

Information in Relation to Disease Prevailing Among Swine and Other Domestic Animals

Information in Relation to Disease Prevailing Among Swine and Other Domestic Animals

“Mr. W. S. Haviland, Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky, says:
In August, 1856, I lost about 30 per cent. of my hogs by cholera. I removed the remainder (about 85 head) from a blue-grass woodland pasture, supplied with a creek of running water, to a dry upland clover and timothy pasture having no water in it. They all seemed, at the time, to be more or less affected with the disease. I gave them all the corn they would eat, and regularly fed them six pounds of salt well stirred and mixed with fifty pounds of half-rotted, strong wood-ashes every seven days. They all got well, and I have never had any hogs do better than those eighty-five head did after their recovery. Of late years, while the disease is prevailing on adjoining farms to my own, I carefully notice my hogs, and when I discover lice or nits on them I wash them with soap-suds made of strong country soap, about once in ten days until all appearances of lice and nits have been removed. I then use soft soap, diluted with hot water to the thickness of thin molasses, besmear it over the head[…]”

Excerpt From: United States. Dept. of Agriculture. “Information in Relation to Disease Prevailing Among Swine and Other Domestic Animals.”

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